Loader Has Raised The Jacket So Boards Can Be Placed Underneath And Bob Harmon And Bea Taylor Can Apply Plaster Bandages To The Underside Of The Jacket

LEFT: I WORKED CAREFULLY ON SEPARATING THE SKULL OF THE WANKEL T. REX FROM THE PELVIS IT HAD ROLLED UP AGAINST SO WE COULD MAKE SEPARATE PLASTER JACKETS FOR EACH BONE GROUP.

heavy to move around the corner, let alone a couple of hundred miles, it had to be taken apart. Our challenge was to try to separate the skeleton into several discrete bundles without breaking apart bones.

Some bones, like those of the leg, were free and clear of other parts and could be wrapped into small individual packages. But for others, Pat had to make difficult decisions about where to separate the bones, especially where the vertebrae of T. rex's back met its pelvis. Somehow Pat found a place to cut away the rock and divide those elements without damaging any bone.

Each group of bones had to be surrounded with tunnels that would allow us to get ropes and steel bands underneath to plaster the sides and bottoms of the bundles as well as the tops. As I mentioned before, this cutting around and below the fossils is called "pedestaling. " It's hard, dirty work. You end up on your back, or your side, reaching deep under huge bones to scrape away at rock. There's not much room to maneuver, particularly with film crew looking over your shoulder

WE NEEDED A FRONT-END LOADER TO GET THE BIGGER BLOCKS OF BONES OUT OF THE GROUND. THIS MACHINE IS A TEREX, PRONOUNCED T. REX BY OUR CREW.

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