Around The Head

the tail seem to have washed so far downstream that we won't find them, though we do have the left hind foot, and one toe and two foot bones of the right foot.

Maybe if we followed the trail of the stream bed through the rock we'd find champsosaur vertebrae or wood fragments that would tell us a bit about which particular animals and plants lived, died, and were fossilized in the neighborhood of this T. rex. But for the moment we were set on finding all the bones we could of T. rex and getting those safely wrapped and back to the lab. Once we'd dug several feet out in every direction from the skeleton and found no more remains, we were satisfied that we'd come upon all the skeletal parts we'd be likely to find.

Though rock still surrounded the bones, our field-work was nearly done. All that remained was the hardest part, finding a way to get the bones we'd found packed and shipped back to the lab, since we can't do much fine preparation in the field.

Since a whole T. rex surrounded by rock is too big and

TOP LEFT: WE DUG AROUND AND DEEP UNDERNEATH THE

W A N K E L T. REX BEFORE JACKETING THE UNDERSIDE. HERE PAT IS USING A DRILL TO DIG UNDER A PARTIALLY JACKETED BUNDLE OF HIP BONES. WE CALL THIS TUNNELING PROCESS "PEDESTALI NG."

TOP LEFT: WE DUG AROUND AND DEEP UNDERNEATH THE

W A N K E L T. REX BEFORE JACKETING THE UNDERSIDE. HERE PAT IS USING A DRILL TO DIG UNDER A PARTIALLY JACKETED BUNDLE OF HIP BONES. WE CALL THIS TUNNELING PROCESS "PEDESTALI NG."

TOP RIGHT: THE FRONT-END

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