Figure Radar Scan

Haps a pocket of water-saturated sediment coincidentally at a depth of eight feet, or possibly the trace of one of the minor faults that riddled the sandstone. Ever the optimist, I was convinced we had (bund bone. I wanted to cart out the pickaxes and shovels right then. That, however, was a ridiculous idea. My friends wisely persuaded me to settle for a cautious celebration of beer and New Mexico tamales. We collected the radar profiles for more detailed evaluation. Roland, Don, and Carrie...

Naming the New Genus

S. Mcintosh lists most of the currently accepted genera of sauropods, along with their ages, principal localities, and comments concerning distinguishing features. Seismosaurus was not included in that list because its formal description had not then been published. Sauropods like Sam flourished in the Jurassic and reached their zenith in diversity at the end of that period, roughly one hundred fifty million years ago. Sam was one of many kinds of sauropods...

High Tech Paleontology

Schematic of ground penetrating radar in operation. Successive traverses along a pre-established grid produce a succession of profiles. The profiles can be interpolated to construct a three-dimensional geometry of the most likely spots to look for bone. tionary object beneath the ground generate a time lapse The answer became evident to me later, when we began the experiments . Making an early site visit to see Sam's burial, or what we hoped would be Sam's burial, Roland also brought colleagues...

Info

Seismosaurus

One hundred fifty million years ago North America was home to magnificent dinosaurs, winged pterosaurs, and the swimming and paddling reptiles of the midcontinental sea. Now, when camping alone in the deserts of the American West after long hours of excavation, I can almost hear the grunts and groans of these ghosts of the Jurassic. I see a herd of Diplodocus jostling for position at a watering hole or sweeping across a barren landscape in quest of food along the river just over the horizon....

Columbia University Press New York

Copyright 1994 Columbia University Press Paintings, maps, and schematic drawings in Chapter 3 1993 Mark Hallett uncredited photographs Southwest Pen and ink work executed by Dana Geraths. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Gillette, David D. Seismosaurus the earth shaker David D. Gillette with illustrations by Mark Hallett. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-231 -07874-9 1. Seismosaurus. I. Hallett, Mark, 1947- II. Title.

T. Rex Attack The New Mexico Museum Of Natural History

Giant Seismosaurus

The type locality of Seismosaurus in the Ojito Wilderness Study Area northwest of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and the Dry Mesa Quarry southeast of Delta, Colorado the type locality o Ultra-saurus macintoshi, Supersaurus viviani. and Dystylosaurus edwini. The giants were common, the supergiants rare. Brachio-saurus is the best known of the supergiants. It weighed about twice as much as Apatosaurus about seven to eleven times that of an elephant. With long neck and forelegs, it had a more...