Late Cretaceous

The global positions of continents during the Late Cretaceous would be almost familiar to us (Figure 2.7). North America became nearly isolated, connected only by a newly emergent land connection across the modern Bering Straits to the eastern Asiatic continent (see Figure 6.31). Although best known from the last Ice Age (100,000 years ago, this land bridge has come and gone several times since the Cretaceous. Africa and South America were fully separated, the former retaining its satellite, Madagascar, and the latter retaining a land bridge to the Antarctica/Australia continent. India was by now well on its way towards its inevitable crash with southern Asia.

LATE CRETACEOUS 94 MYA

LATE CRETACEOUS 94 MYA

Antarctica South America Land Bridge

Figure 2.7. The positions of the continents during the Late Cretaceous (94 Ma). The positions of the continents did not differ significantly from their present-day distribution. Note the land bridge between Asia and North America, as well as the European archipelago. By this point in time, both of the supercontinents, Gondwana and Laurasia, have disintegrated.

Figure 2.7. The positions of the continents during the Late Cretaceous (94 Ma). The positions of the continents did not differ significantly from their present-day distribution. Note the land bridge between Asia and North America, as well as the European archipelago. By this point in time, both of the supercontinents, Gondwana and Laurasia, have disintegrated.

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