Spikiest Dinosaur

Flexible armored bands

Flexible armored bands

Dinosaur With Long Tail

Dinosaur fossils often show evidence of fighting in the form of broken bones

Diplodocus may have flicked its long tail like a whip, causing serious damage to attackers.

Dinosaur fossils often show evidence of fighting in the form of broken bones

Like some dinosaurs, modern iguanas have a row of spikes on their necks and backs to deter attacks from predators.

Land iguana

Land iguana

How useful were massive claws?

| A Therizinosaurus had three huge, lethal-looking claws on each hand. However, some experts think the claws were too blunt to be used as weapons. Instead, they may have been used for feeding—to pluck foliage from trees or to rip open the nests of termites. If so, how this dinosaur defended itself remains a mystery.

Which was the spikiest dinosaur?

Kentrosaurus, meaning "spiked lizard," was certainly one of the spikiest. It was an East African stegosaur, which measured about 16 ft (5 m) long. Pairs of bone plates protected its neck, shoulders, and back. Six pairs of spikes—each of which was up to 2 ft (60 cm) in length—adorned its lower back and tail. Kentrosaurus would have used these spikes to fend off theropods, such as Allosaurus.

Which dinosaur had a thumb spike?

| A Iguanodon was a large herbivore without spines, plates, or claws. Its only defensive weapon was a single long spike on each thumb. Paleontologists believe this dinosaur may have jabbed at attacking theropods with the spike. Iguanodon had unusually flexible hands and was able to grasp food in its fingers.

tijH

tijH

Dinosaur With Thumb Spike
Thumb spike up to 6 in (15 cm) in length

Neck scutes

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  • Ralph
    What was the spikiest dinosaur?
    9 years ago

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