Nodosaurids

Armored with bony plates and dangerous spikes, but lacking the clubbed tail of the ankylosaurids, the nodosaurids were the most primitive of the ankylosaurs. They ranged in size from 5 ft (1.6 m) to 25 ft (7.6 m) in length. Nodosaurid fossils have been found in rocks worldwide.

Crown of tooth with ridged edge

Ground grazer Edmontonia had small, weak teeth on the sides of its jaws. They were leaf-shaped and flattened - ideal for chopping up leafy vegetation.

Root of tooth

Edmontonia one of the largest of the nodosaurids, Edmontonia probably grew to about 23 ft (7 m) in length. Long spikes lined the sides and shoulders, and tough neck plates protected it from tyrannosaurid fangs.

Gap between jaws for cheek pouch

Plates on top of skull

Gap between jaws for cheek pouch

Plates on top of skull

Root of tooth

Sheeplike skull The pear-shaped skull of Edmontonia resembles that of a sheep. It had cheek pouches in which to store food. The top of the skull was reinforced with bony plates for protection.

Armor plate

Armor plate

Dinosaur Armor Plates
Wide feet

Sauropelta

An armor of spikes, bony cones, and small studs stretched along the back and tail of Sauropelta. Its underside was unprotected, so it may have crouched close to the ground when under attack.

Bony cones

Bony studs

/Shoulder spikes

Bony cones

Bony studs

Polacanthus Two rows of spines jutted out of Polacanthus' back. There were also two rows of triangular bony scutes along its tail.

Cheek, teeth

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