Fleet foot

Ornithomimus was one of the speediest dinosaurs. its three foot bones were locked together, making a long extension to the leg. Running on the tips of its toes, it could take long strides. Ornithomimus may have reached top speeds of 37 mph (60 km/h) - fast enough to escape most predators.

Legs like pillars The heaviest dinosaurs had pillarlike legs, like those of elephants. Brachiosaurus weighed about 50 tons (tonnes) so it needed thick, strong legs to support its body.

Brachiosaurus Leg Bone
Widely

Stout limbs spaced toes

Widely spaced toes and thick, stout limb bones helped Triceratops spread the weight of its massive body. The shorter forelimbs carried the weight of Triceratops' huge head. Much of the body weight was supported by the long and powerful rear legs. Short and stubby toes on all four feet ended in hoof-shaped claws.

Jf More about limbs

The shape of a dinosaur's feet depended on whether it walked on two or four legs. Four-legged dinosaurs had similar front and rear feet, spreading their weight on hooflike toes. Two-legged dinosaurs could use their front feet like hands, grasping at prey or holding plant food.

The claw was the first part of Baryonyx to be discovered, giving the dinosaur the nickname "Claws."

The Claw Part Hoof

The claw was the first part of Baryonyx to be discovered, giving the dinosaur the nickname "Claws."

Giant claw The powerful carnivore Baryonyx had one of the largest dinosaur claws known. The curved talon, which was 12 in (31 cm) long, formed a huge weapon on Baryonyx's hand.

Polacanthus Claw Fossil

Middle fingers joined together

Fifth finger

Large thumb spike

Claw for protection Apatosaurus, a giant sauropod dinosaur, had a pointed claw on each front foot, which it may have used for defense.

Iguanodon fossilized foot bones

Middle fingers joined together

Fifth finger

Large thumb spike

Iguanodon Hand Bone

iguanodon hand Iguanodon could use its hands in several ways. It could use the hoofed middle fingers for walking, and the long fifth fingers could hook onto plants. The thumb spikes were probably defensive weapons used for stabbing enemies.

Preserved iguanodon footprint

Preserved iguanodon footprint

The broad, three-toed footprint matches the fossilized foot bones.

dinosaur print

Iguanodon left many clues behind when it became extinct. When it walked on damp sand or mud it left footprints, which dried and became preserved. The footprints of an adult Iguanodon would have been about 35 in (90 cm) long.

Mud Fossils

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  • richard
    How strong are dinosaur claws?
    3 years ago

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