Avimimus Struthioides Torture Bird

Avimimus struthioides

Large Animal

Hit Dice:

5d10+15 (43 hp)

Initiative:

+3 (Dex)

Speed:

60 ft.

AC:

14 (+3 Dex, +2 natural, -1 size)

Attacks:

Bite +6 melee, 2 claws +1 melee

Damage:

Bite 1d10+8, 2 claws 1d3

Face/Reach:

5 ft. by 10 ft./10 ft.

Special Attacks:

Combination attack

Saves:

Fort +7, Ref +7, Will +3

Abilities:

Str 18, Dex 16, Con 16,

Int 5, Wis 14, Cha 8

Skills:

Listen +4, Spot +8

Climate/Terrain:

Desert, warm forest or plains

Organization:

Solitary, family (2-4), or pack (5-20)

Challenge Rating:

2

Treasure:

Standard

Alignment:

Lawful evil

Advancement:

6-8 HD (Large)

Protoceratops

Avimimus struithioides (the "ostrich-shaped bird mimic") is a 15 ft. long descendant of the original dinosaur Avimimus, which was smaller than a man. It is built somewhat like ornitholestes, but with the beaked head of a bird, downy feathers covering its torso, and larger feathers adorning its arms and forming a crest on the back of the head. The Cretasus version has the ordinary bird's beak replaced by the hooked raptoral beak of a bird of prey.

Unlike its omnivorous ancestor, this creature is a pure carnivore, using its speed and agility to run down creatures far weaker than it, which it will (when opportunity provides) kill as slowly and cruelly as possible. Cretasus veterans say it has the cruelty of a ceratosaur and the intelligence and organizational ability of ornitholestes: a bad combination, indeed.

SOCIETY

These creatures tend to be solitary hunters throughout much of their range, which is usually desert or plains. When there is enough game available to support them in greater numbers, or when they must combine because the only prey is too powerful for one of them to handle, they hunt in small family groups of a half-dozen or more, or even in large packs. They realize quite well, it seems, that strength of numbers will give them more food and more opportunities for torture than a solo act will. On the plus side, they mate for life, and will not seek a new mate if the old one is killed.

They use their speed and agility in place of brute strength, not only on the hunt, but also in settling differences among one another, either engaging in a simple foot race or performing an intricate dance (which is also used to attract females during the mating season). Young animals stay with their parents until they are fully grown, unless the region they occupy is so barren of food that they have to leave early to find their own hunting grounds.

COMBAT

When tackling prey of Medium-size or larger, Avimimus struthioides fights primarily with vicious slashes from its wickedly-hooked beak in a series of hit-and-run attacks. Smaller creatures are, of course, simply snapped up, or played with first when there is time. The claws tend to come into use only if the creature is surprised and forced to struggle at close quarters with no room to maneuver, or as supplemental weapons once the victim is bleeding heavily and unable to react to attacks as swiftly as before. Then the avimimid will launch three attacks on a single spot, first tearing a wound out with the hooked beak, then using the clawed forepaws to widen it, adding to the damage. Against a totally helpless victim, the creature will draw out this prospect beyond all reasonable time, seeming to enjoy the death agonies of helpless prey. Any PC who gets caught in a bad way by one or more of these creatures when he is unable to fight back would be well-advised to save the last bullet for himself.

Fortunately, the forepaws of these creatures are not nimble enough to use captured human or alien weaponry. However, the dinosaurs still like to collect them, as well as anything else that captures their attention, as they have a definite pack rat mentality. Needless to say, this does nothing to endear them to the explorers and settlers of Storm Valley, particularly as they have been known to trade weapons to dinosaurs that can use them in exchange for food or pretty items such as gemstones or gold nuggets.

Combination Attack (Ex): If the avimimid succeeds in a bite attack by a margin of 5 or more (e.g., if it rolls 18 or better against an opponent with AC 13), it may immediately follow up with its two claw attacks on the exact same spot. When used in such a combination, the claw attacks are made at the same attack bonus as the bite and inflict an extra +2 damage per claw.

BYPRODUCTS

The sharp-hooked beak of Avimimus struthioides is eight inches in length, making a good dagger which can be sold for $80. Its claws make smaller daggers, with a complete set worth $40. Aside from this, there are no items of value to be gained from killing them, other than the treasure they may have gathered. Given their cruelty and intelligence, it is obvious that training them, even while young, would be a waste of time. However, anyone who has seen them kill will readily agree that killing them is its own reward.

CARNOCORNUS MEGALO-CORNUS ("BLACKHORN")

Carnocornus megalo-cornus Huge Animal

13 (-2 size, +1 Dex, +4 natural) Gore +16 melee, bite +11 melee, claws +2 melee

Gore 2d8+9, bite 1d8+7, claws 1d4 10 ft. by 10 ft./15 ft. Charging gore Scent

Fort +13, Ref +9, Will +7 Str 24, Dex 13, Con 18, Int 6, Wis 15, Cha 12 Listen +12, Spot +5

Climate/Terrain: Warm forest, plains, and desert

Organization: Challenge Rating: Treasure: Alignment: Advancement:

Solitary or family (1-2 adults, 1-4 young) 7

Standard

Chaotic neutral

16-30 HD (Gargantuan)

Hit Dice: Initiative: Speed: AC:

Attacks:

Carnotaurus

Damage: Face/Reach: Special Attacks: Special Qualities: Saves: Abilities:

Skills:

Carnocornus megalocornus ("large-horned flesh horn") is a descendant of the original carnosaur carnotaurus ("flesh bull"), whose head was adorned with a pair of large horns. In its descendant, however, these horns and longer and sharper (7 feet long!), and are in fact used as an offensive weapon. The horns are a shiny black in color, offsetting the creature's light green back and pale yellow belly.

Carnocornus is a carnivore, but it shares some qualities with large horned herbivores like bulls and rhinos, most notably an irritable disposition and a tendency to charge anything that comes too close, whether it's hungry or not.

SOCIETY

These carnosaurs are solitary hunters for the most part. They roam the forests, plains, and deserts of Storm Valley in search of prey, only coming together during the mating season. At this time, opposing males will step up to one another and carefully lock their horns together, after which they engage in a shoving match. The sharp horns " ' are far too dangerous to be used in outright ramming attacks. The stronger male wins the fight and a mate. The male may or may not stay with the female to help tend the young; if not, she can do the job quite well on her own.

All rival predators are driven out of Carnocornus' territory by the points of its horns. The only exceptions are others of its kind, in which case the interlocked-horn shoving match comes into play again. This species is not very bright compared to, say, the allosaurs, but its instincts allow it to keep destructive combat between members of its own kind to the absolute minimum.

COMBAT

Like its ancestor Carnotaurus, Carnocornus has surprisingly weak jaws for such a large animal, as well as the typically weak forepaws of most carnosaurs, and this is reflected in the damage stats. As a result, it tends to rely primarily on its sharp horns for combat, whether fighting off an enemy or bringing down large prey.

Charging Gore (Ex): The carnosaur will stand off from its target at a distance, and then deliver a high-speed charge that ends with the victim impaled on its huge horns. If Carnocornus moves its full speed before an attack, the gore inflicts double damage. If the victim foregoes attacks of opportunity, it may attempt a Reflex save (DC 16, not inclusive of the -2 penalty noted below) to take half damage (assume only one horn of the pair actually hits the target).

Like the Cape buffalo of Earth, Carnocornus keeps its head raised and its eyes on the target for the entire charge, lowering its head to gore only at the last moment. Because of this, all opponents facing a charge have a -2 penalty to their Reflex save when trying to evade this charge.

BYPRODUCTS

The massively-horned head of Carnocornus would be a prized addition to any big-game hunter's trophy collection, so safaris to hunt these creatures down are becoming more common. They have some competition from pharmacists, however, for the material these horns are composed of is a powerful stimulant. When ground into powder and ingested, an ounce's worth of this material will provide a +1 enhancement bonus to Strength for 4d6 hours. A single horn is thus worth $1,200, and a normal pair $2,400.

Despite these creatures' vicious reputation, some people are willing to pay $200 for one of their eggs. It is suspected that any captive Carnocornus thus obtained and raised would not be truly domesticated, but merely kept in a compound next to some facility that is valuable and needs special protection, such as a military research center.

CERATOPS SUSOIDES ("PIG BEAK, "TUSKER")

Hit Dice: Initiative: Speed: AC:

Attacks:

Damage:

Face/Reach:

Special Attacks:

Special Qualities:

Saves:

Abilities:

Skills:

Ceratops susoides Medium Animal

13 sides and back (+3 natural)

Bite +5 melee

Bite 1d6+7

Gore

Scent, resistance to poison

Listen +7, Spot +6, Wilderness Lore +3

Climate/Terrain:

Organization:

Challenge Rating:

Treasure:

Alignment:

Advancement:

Any land

Standard Always neutral 4-6 HD (Medium)

Ceratops susoides ("pig-shaped horn face") is a small cer-atopsian dinosaur, in size not much different from protoceratops, but far less intelligent. In fact, this "small" (though it weighs from 100-200 pounds) animal is the dinosaur equivalent of a wild boar, peccary, or warthog. It has a short bony frill and a relatively small beak, from which protrude tusks at least 5 inches in length. These tusks are used both as a weapon and as a tool for digging up roots, grubs, and worms, for this particular ceratopsian has evolved an omnivorous diet. It also eats carrion when it can get it, and expeditions into Storm Valley have more than once gone through the inconvenience - to say the least - of having this animal raid their food stores.

SOCIETY

Ceratops susoides roams alone, in small family groups of one or two adults and up to four young, or even herds of up to sixteen animals. Because it has adopted the omnivorous lifestyle of the pig, it has proven itself to be one of the most versatile of dinosaurs, being equally at home in jungles, forests, plains, deserts, marshes, hills, and mountains. It can eat anything, and is relatively small as dinosaurs go, so there is little or no competition or hostility between different herds if they run into each other in the course of foraging expeditions. If the low-growing fruits are eaten, they can dig up roots. If those are eaten, they can eat mushrooms and other plants. And if those are gone, they can root around for grubs and worms, or run down and kill small animals, or find the eggs of creatures that nest on or near the ground, or even scavenge from dead bodies. Something is always available.

By contrast, if nearby creatures appear to be even a potential threat, the adults of the herd will drive them out at once if it is within their power to do so. If not, as would be the case if a giant carnosaur appeared, the entire herd will withdraw as swiftly and silently as possible. In case of attack by an unstoppable opponent, the entire herd will separate and scatter to all points of the compass, reuniting later with a combination of body odor and high-pitched grunts that only their own kind can hear.

COMBAT

For its size, Ceratops susoides is a fierce fighter, snapping at the enemy with its powerful beak. It can also use its tusks in combat, and has other powers as well.

Gore (Ex): When fighting an enemy head-on, Ceratops susoides can gore and rip with its sharp tusks. This gore attack is +7 melee and does 2d6+9 points of damage, but can only be used against a single opponent directly in front of the Ceratops susoides. If the creature makes a gore attack, it may not bite.

Resistance to Poison (Ex): Another thing this creature shares with the pigs it resembles is a strong resistance to poisons. Whenever the animal is hit with a poison-based attack, it only suffers half damage. If it makes its saving throw, it suffers no damage at all. If the poison causes nausea, unconsciousness, or the like instead of physical damage, then a failed save halves the duration.

BYPRODUCTS

The flesh of Ceratops susoides is a gourmet's delight, making it a frequently-hunted animal. Given its tendency to eat anything it finds, it will also no doubt be hunted as a nuisance to be exterminated once farming begins in Storm Valley. The tusks make suitable daggers, costing $20 apiece. Its intact hide may also be sold for about $30. These creatures apparently prefer privacy when they mate, heading for the thickest brush or other cover available. As a result, no one knows whether they lay eggs or produce young via live birth. Either a new-born youngster or an egg, however, would net anyone who brought one in about $20.

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Responses

  • MELODY GARRISON
    Did the Avimimus lay eggs?
    8 years ago
  • senay
    Who were Avimimas dinasaurs' enemies?
    8 years ago
  • oscar
    When is the mating season of protoceratops?
    7 years ago

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