Allosaurus Temnonychus Claw Cutter

Allosaurus temnonychus

Huge Animal

Hit Dice:

18d10+90 (189 hp)

Initiative:

+2 (Dex)

Speed:

50 ft.

AC:

15 (-2 size, +2 Dex, +5 natural)

Attacks:

Claws +19 melee, bite +14 melee

Damage:

Claws 4d8+13, bite 3d8+11

Face/Reach:

15 ft. by 15 ft./15 ft.

Special Attacks:

Improved grab, swallow whole

Special Qualities:

Scent

Saves:

Fort +16, Ref +13, Will +10

Abilities:

Str 27, Dex 15, Con 20,

Int 12, Wis 19, Cha 14

Skills:

Listen +10, Spot +14, Wilderness Lore +5

Climate/Terrain:

Warm forest, hill, plains, and marsh

Organization:

Solitary, pair, or pack (4-8)

Challenge Rating:

8

Treasure:

Standard

Alignment:

Neutral

Advancement:

19-36 HD (Gargantuan)

Allosaurus temnonychus (the "cutting claw") gets its name from the massive foot-long claws on each of its forelimbs. These claws, allied to massively powerful arm muscles - among the most powerful of any carnivorous dinosaur - do terrible damage, even more than the great jaws. Even worse from the standpoint of human explorers is the fact that allosaurus temnonychus is the allosaur species most likely to attack without warning or compassion. This follows the trend set by their weaker, yet still-powerful relative A. cenovenator, leading to the unpleasant conclusion that the stronger the allosaur species is (and thus more able to enforce its demands and achieve its desires on its own), the less likely it is to reason with others. To those who know only the allosaurs of the Main Valley, this is a depressing and alarming commentary on allosaur psychology, but it seems to fit the facts.

SOCIETY

A. temnonychus is considerably more organized than its less-advanced relatives, frequently employing pack-hunting tactics

against larger and more dangerous herbivores. In fact, even in the short space of time humans have been observing them, there have been many known cases of separate packs temporarily uniting to join forces against a particularly dangerous opponent, such as a herd of giant sauropods, ceratopsians, or armored dinosaurs, a pack or family group of a larger carnosaur species, or the human intruders into Storm Valley. It was an alliance of two separate packs of this carnosaur species that slew Jerrold Connors and a third of his men when they conducted their desperate rearguard action to let the party's scientists get away with the knowledge they had gained. This species of allosaur is one of the prime movers of the siege of Fort Phil Kearny, and one of the most feared by those Union soldiers unfortunate enough to be stationed there.

COMBAT

Unlike all other allosaur species, A. temnonychus actually inflicts more damage with the claws on its powerful forearms than with its bite, although this is still a potent weapon in itself. When fighting larger dinosaurs, particularly prey species like the sauropods, the carnosaur will bite the victim first, then strike the wound with both clawed fore-limbs in an attempt to widen it. Most ominously for human intruders in the region, the species actually seems to glory in combat Although it still scavenges when a good opportunity arises, it seems to do so without enthusiasm.

Improved Grab (Ex): An allosaur that hits a Medium-size or smaller creature with its bite attack may grab them. It may then attempt to swallow them whole.

Swallow Whole (Ex): An allosaur can swallow a Medium-size or smaller creature with a successful grapple check. Swallowed creatures take 2d8+8 points of crushing damage plus 8 points of acid damage per round. A swallowed creature may cut itself out by using Small or Tiny slashing weapons to deal 25 points of damage to the allosaur's innards (AC 20).

ANKYLOSAURUS PELTASPINOS ("SPINYDILLO")

Hit Dice: Initiative: Speed: AC:

Attacks:

Damage:

Face/Reach:

Special Attacks:

Special Qualities:

Saves:

Abilities:

Skills: Feats:

Ankylosaurus peltaspinos Gargantuan Animal

Tail club +20 melee

Tail club 5d6+9/crit 18-20

Target Ankles, Spines

Scent, Defensive Crouch

Power Attack, Cleave, Great

Cleave

Climate/Terrain:

Organization:

Challenge Rating:

Treasure:

Alignment:

Advancement:

Desert, plains, forest, riverbanks Small herds (6-8) 8

Standard Neutral

21-25 HD (Gargantuan)

Ankylosaurus peltaspinos is a larger and more lethally adorned version of the regular ankylosaurus. With a maximum length of 40 feet, its most noticeable feature is the vast array of foot-long spines covering its carapace. The entire carapace is separated into little bony squares, and each square has a spine coming out of the center.

SOCIETY

With increased power comes increased aggressiveness. This old adage holds true for herbivores as well as carnivores, as the plant-eating neighbors of Ankylosaurus peltaspinos can testify. As with their less advanced relatives, they will drive all rival herbivores out of a good grazing area, in addition to all large carnivores (and even Medium-size and smaller carnivores during the breeding season, when young animals are about). Matriarchal as all ankylosaur herds, they nevertheless see some spectacular tail-club duels at the start of the mating season, as the males compete for the favors of the females.

Their herds wander constantly, but will settle down in one spot - the lushest grazing spot they can find - when it is time to breed. The choice of where to settle is decided entirely by the area's ability to support the herd for a prolonged period of time, and although the lusher regions get more than their fair share of attention, they will be dropped without regret if a prolonged drought or blight spoils them. From half-a-dozen to a dozen eggs are laid by each female, with roughly half of each clutch living to maturity - an unusually high proportion, due primarily to the increased care the herd takes in driving out potential predators (including the PCs).

COMBAT

These creatures fight as do all of their kind, crouching low to the ground so as to protect their vulnerable bellies, then lashing out with their tail clubs. When multiple foes of relatively small size are about, such as humans or raptors, they will often mow down num-

bers of them at a time with a single tail slap, courtesy of the Great Cleave feat.

Spines (Ex): The spines on the carapace of Ankylosaurus peltaspinos ("spiny shield") are an extra protection. Any creature that comes into physical contact with the creature takes 1d8 points of damage, which can be avoided with a Reflex save (DC 14). Any attack made with a reach of 5 ft. or less (whether a natural attack or a melee weapon) counts as coming into physical contact. Ranged weapons and weapons with reach avoid the spines. The spine damage is a recurring attack - even if you make a Reflex save one round, you still need to make another one on the next round.

Defensive Crouch (Ex): An ankylosaurus feeling defensive can crouch, tuck its head in and draw its legs up beneath its body. This minimizes the already few vulnerable areas and grants a +6 circumstance bonus to AC. When crouched as such, the ankylosaurus cannot move or attack. Ankylosaurs generally do this only when injured or facing overwhelming odds. Only a handful of specialized long-armed predators can successfully attack them when they are crouched.

Target Ankles (Ex): Ankylosaurs always aim for their enemy's ankles. For a creature so low to the ground, this is its best defense against large theropods. All ankylosaurus attacks have a threat range of 18-20. On any critical hit, the ankylosaur scores double damage, and the target must make a Fortitude save (DC 18) or have its leg broken. A target with a broken leg cannot run, moves at half speed and is considered flat-footed at all times.

BYPRODUCTS

As with the original Ankylosaurus, the main value of A. peltaspinos is its heavy armor, which can be used to provide defensive armor for domesticated dinosaurs, be they cargo-hauling brachiosaurs or the smaller and more aggressive beasts ridden by the Dino Riders. If properly cured, the hide can convey its spiny protection to the bearer.

ANOPLOTOPS FEROX ("PARROTBEAK")

Hit Dice: Initiative: Speed: AC: Attacks: Damage: Face/Reach: Special Attacks: Special Qualities: Saves: Abilities:

Skills:

Anoplotops ferox Huge Animal

Bite +20 melee

Bite 3d8+11

Armor crush, trample

Scent

Fort +17, Ref +5, Will +6 Str 20, Dex 9, Con 25, Int 6, Wis 12, Cha 7 Listen +12, Spot +10

Climate/Terrain:

Organization:

Challenge Rating:

Treasure:

Alignment:

Advancement:

Warm forest, hill, and plains Solitary or herd (10-50, 20% young) 7

None

Lawful neutral 18-34 HD (Gargantuan), 35-52 HD (Colossal)

This slate-gray animal is a living paradox: a horned dinosaur without horns. Not only that, but this 35 foot long beast also lacks the bony frill owned by virtually all other ceratopsians. By way of compensation, it has a massive parrotlike beak, which can crush bones and tree trunks (its favorite food) with equal ease.

SOCIETY

Anoplotops ferox roams in sizeable herds run by a matriarchy. It is almost unique among ceratopsians in that the males do not fight for the females' favors at the breeding season. Instead, each male has a type of musk gland that gives off a pungent odor, subtly different for each individual. The females of the herd sniff over their suitors, selecting the one whose smell they like the best. In almost all other ways, their behavior conforms to that of Cretasus ceratopsians in general: migrating along regular routes, "petitioning" would-be herd members, and so on. They tend to get along well with all other herbivores, at least as long as there is enough grazing and water for all, but the males aggressively rush any carnivores that venture too near the herd. If they encounter a creature never seen before, such as a human, they assume the worst for safety's sake, and take an attitude of "charge first, ask questions later."

COMBAT

Anoplotops ferox' standard attack is to rush at a predator and bite it with its massive beak, aiming primarily for the hind legs when the enemy is a carnosaur. One reason they are so aggressive is their lack of body armor; they cannot afford to be passive in the face of a potential threat. Aside from the standard bite, they have two special attacks:

Armor Crush (Ex): The massive beak of this ceratopsian is literally like that of a giant parrot, and works like a nutcracker. This is good for splintering tree trunks, and it has an added value now that humans with armor are invading Storm Valley. So suitable is the beak of this creature for cracking hard items that any opponent with non-natural armor (such as a Union Ironclad or an infantryman with a flak jacket) receives only one-half the benefits of his armor bonus to Armor Class, rounding down when necessary. Thus, a soldier wearing riot gear (normally +6) receives only a +3 bonus to AC. Energy armor and Dexterity bonuses are not affected.

Moreover, the suit of armor will be quickly ruined as it is split open by the creature's bites. After each successful hit, the armor's bonus is halved, rounding down, until it reaches +0 and is utterly destroyed. For example, the aforementioned riot gear would offer only a +1 bonus after the first hit, and would be ruined thereafter. All subsequent attacks of any sort will be made on a totally defenseless victim so far as armor bonuses are concerned.

Trample (Ex): A. ferox can trample creatures of Medium size or smaller, inflicting 2d12+10 points of damage. The intended victim can attempt to halve this damage by making a Reflex save (DC 23), assuming he is willing to forgo an attack of opportunity.

BYPRODUCTS

Aside from anoplotops flesh being a delicacy (the pink meat is something like smoked turkey in flavor), the scent emitted from the male musk glands is not unpleasant to human nostrils, and in fact is now in great demand as an ingredient for men's cologne. A single vial (equivalent to a vial of antitoxin in size) filled with this musk is valued at $500. The scent is so strong that a little bit goes a long way - the creature's musk glands contain enough musk at one time to fill ten such vials. Of course, one must kill the animal to remove the musk, and the herd members do tend to stick together in the event of attack...

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