Notes And References

Chapter 1: Looking for Babies

1. B. Brown and E. M. Schlaikjer, "The Structure and Relationships of Protoceratops," Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences XL (3) (1940): 133-266.

P. Dodson, "Taxonomic Implications of Relative Growth in Lambeosaurine Hadro-saurs," Systematic Zoology 2A (1975):37-54.

2. C. M. Sternberg, "A Juvenile Hadrosaur from the Oldman Formation of Alberta," National Museum of Canada Bulletin 136 (1955): 120-122.

3. M. M. Chow, "Notes on the Late Cretaceous Dinosaurian Remains and the Fossil Eggs from Laiyang Shantung," Bulletin, Geological Society of China 31 (1951): 89-96.

W. Granger, "The Story of the Dinosaur Eggs," Natural History 38 (1936):21-25. G. L. Jepsen, "Dinosaur Eggshell Fragments from Montana," Science 73 (1931):12-13.

V. Van Straelen, "Les oeufs de reptiles fossiles," Palaeobiologica 1 (1928):296-312. Roy Chapman Andrews, "Where the Dinosaur Hid Its Eggs," Asia Qanuary 1924):163-166.

4. R. Gradzinski, "Sedimentation of Dinosaur-Bearing Upper Cretaceous Deposits of the Nemegt Basin, Gobi Desert," Palaeontologia Polanica 21 (1969): 147-229.

5. We also took with us to the rock shop and the fossil fish dig Gay Vostries, the manager of the paleontology collection at the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, who was in Montana that summer to visit several paleontological digs.

6. J. C. Lorenz, "Sedimentary and Tectonic History of the Two Medicine Formation, Late Cretaceous (Companion), North-western Montana" (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, 1981).

-and W. Gavin, "Geology of the Two Medicine Formation and the Sedimentol-

ogy of a Dinosaur Nesting Ground," Montana Geological Society Field Conference Guidebook (1984): 175-186.

7. P. Dodson, "Taxonomic Implications of Relative Growth in Lambeosaurine Hadro-saurs," Systematic Zoology 2A (1975):37-54.

8. From C. M. Sternberg, "A Juvenile Hadrosaur from the Oldman Formation of Alberta," National Museum of Canada Bulletin 136 (1955): 120-122.

Other reports and comments on this same subject include:

K. Carpenter, "Baby Dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous Lance and Hell Creek Formations and a Description of a New Species of Theropod," Contributions to Geology, University of Wyoming 20(2) (1982): 123-134.

G. L. Jepsen, "Riddles of the Terrible Lizards," American Scientist 52 (1964): 227-246.

9. C. W. Gilmore, "Hunting Dinosaurs in Montana," Explorations and Field Work of the Smithsonian Institution in 1928 (1929):7-12.

Chapter 2: The First Nest

1. J. R. Horner and R. Makela, "Nest of Juveniles Provides Evidence of Family Structure Among Dinosaurs," Nature 282 (1979):296-298.

Chapter 3: The Good Mother Lizard

1. Sources that provided information on dinosaurs, their environment and history include:

Robert T. Bakker, The Dinosaur Heresies (New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1986).

Edwin H. Colbert, Dinosaurs, Their Discovery and Their World (New York: E. P. Dutton&Ca.Inc, 1961).

-, Dinosaurs: An Illustrated History (Maplewood, N.J.: Hammond, Inc.,

David Dineley, Earth's Voyage Through Time (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1974). Adrian J. Desmond, The Hot Blooded Dinosaurs: A Revolution in Paleontology (New York: The Dial Press/James Wade, 1976).

Url Lanham, The Bone Hunters (New York: Columbia University Press, 1973). George Gaylord Simpson, Life of the Past: An Introduction to Paleontology (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1953).

John Noble Wilford, The Riddle of the Dinosaur (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985).

The Diagram Group, A Field Guide to Dinosaurs (New York: Avon, 1983). Dale A. Russell, A Vanished World. The Dinosaurs of Western Canada (Ottawa: National Museums of Canada, 1977).

2. R. S. Lull and N. E. Wright, "Hadrosaurian Dinosaurs of North America," Geological Society of America, Special Paper 40 (1942):l-242.

3. J. R. Horner, "A New Hadrosaur (Reptilia; Ornithischia) from the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation of Montana," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (in press).

4. Url Lanham, The Bone Hunters (New York: Columbia University Press, 1973).

5. D. B. Weishampel, "Evolution of Jaw Mechanisms in Ornithopod Dinosaurs," Advances in Anatomy, Embryology and Cell Biology 87 (1984): 1-109.

7. T. Maryanska and H. Osmolska, "Some Implications of Hadrosaurian Postcranial Anatomy," Acta Paleontologica Polonica 28 (1983):205-207.

8. J. R. Horner and R. Makela, "Nest of Juveniles Provides Evidence of Family Structure Among Dinosaurs," Nature 282 (1979):296-298.

9. J. R. Horner, "Cranial Osteology and Morphology of the Type Specimen of Maiasaura Peeblesorum (Ornithischia: Hadrosauridae), with Discussion of Its Phylo-genetic Position," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 3(1) (1983):29-38.

-, "Three Ecologically Distinct Vertebrate Faunal Communities from the Late

Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana, with Discussion of Evolutionary Pressures Induced by Interior Seaway Fluctuations," Montana Geological Society Field Conference Guidebook (1984):299-303.

Chapter 4: Nesting in Colonies

1. J. C. Lorenz and W. Gavin, "Geology of the Two Medicine Formation and the Sedimentology of a Dinosaur Nesting Ground," Montana Geological Society Field Conference Guidebook (1984): 175-186.

2. G. J. Retallack, "Fossil Soils: Indications of Ancient Terrestrial Environments," in Paleobotany, Paleoecology and Evolution, Vol. 1, ed. K. J. Niklas (New York: Praeger, 1981), pp. 55-102.

3. W. M. B. Gavin, "A Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction of the Cretaceous Willow Creek Anticline Dinosaur Nesting Locality: North Central Montana" (master's thesis, Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, 1986).

Chapter 5: The Herd

1. R. T. Bird, "Did Brontosaurus Ever Walk on Land?" Natural History 53 (1944): 61-67.

2. P. J. Currie and P. Dodson, "Mass Death of a Herd of Ceratopsian Dinosaurs," in

Third Symposium on Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems, Short Papers, eds. W. E. Reif and F. Westphal (Tubingen: ATTEMPTO Verlag, 1984), pp. 61-66.

D. B. Norman, "A Mass-Accumulation of Vertebrates from the Lower Cretaceous of Nehden (Sauerland), West Germany," Proceedings, Royal Society of London B 230 (1987):215-255.

J. H. Ostrom, "Were Some Dinosaurs Gregarious?" Palaeogeography, Palaeoclima-tology, Palaeoecology 11 (1972): 287-301.

F. Von Huene, "Lebensbild des Saurischier-Vorkommens in obersten Keuper von Trossingen in Wurttemberg," Palaeobiologica 1 (1928): 103-116.

3. 0. Abel, "Die Neuen Dinosaurierfunde in der Oberkreide Canadas," Jahrag. Naturwiss. Berlin 12 (1924) :709-716.

J. 0. Farlow and P. Dodson, "The Behavioral Significance of Frill and Horn Morphology in Ceratopsian Dinosaurs," Evolution 29 (1974):353-361. J. A. Hopson, "The Evolution of Cranial Display Structures in Hadrosaurian Dinosaurs," Paleobiology 1(1) (1975):21-43.

R. E. Molnar, "Analogies in the Evolution of Combat and Display Structures in Ornithopods and Ungulates," Evolutionary Theory?, (1977):165-190.

Chapter 6: Egg Mountain

1. Philip J. Currie, "Bird-Like Characteristics of the Jaws and Teeth of Troodontid Theropods (Dinosauria, Saurischia)," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 7(1) (March 1987):72-81.

2. J. R. Horner and D. B. Weishampel, "A Comparative Embryological Study of Two Ornithischian Dinosaurs," Nature 332 (1988):256-257.

3. J. R. Horner, "Ecologic and Behavioral Implications Derived from a Dinosaur Nesting Site," in Dinosaurs Past and Present, Vol. 2, eds. S. J. Czerkas and E. C. Olson (Natural History Museum, Los Angeles County/University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1987), pp. 51-63.

4. J. R. Horner and D. B. Weishampel, "A Comparative Embryological Study of Two Ornithischian Dinosaurs," Nature 332 (1988):256-257.

Chapter 7: Haute Bones

1. P. Taquet, "Cuvier-Buckland-Mantell and the Dinosaurs," in Actes du Symposium Paleontologigue, eds. E. Buffetaut, J. M. Mazin and E. Salmon (Montbeliard: G. Cuvier, 1983), pp. 476-494.

2. The question of who is first on the issue of warmblooded dinosaurs is just too tangled for me to unravel, given the different emphases by different scientists at different times. For anyone who wants to try to sort it out, among the early important papers making reference to this subject are:

R. T. Bakker, "The Superiority of Dinosaurs," Discovery (Peabody Museum, Yale University) 3(1) (1968):ll-22.

-, "Dinosaur Physiology and the Origin of Mammals," Evolution 25

-, "Anatomical and Ecological Evidence of Endothermy in Dinosaurs," Nature

J. H. Ostrom, "Terrestrial Vertebrates as Indicators of Mesozoic Climates," North American Paleontological Convention Proceedings (Chicago, 1969) D (1970): 347-376.

A. J. de Ricqles, "Evolution of Endothermy: Histological Evidence," Evolutionary Theory 1 (1974):51-80.

3. The most valuable recent volume on the issue of warmbloodedness in dinosaurs is A Cold Look at the Warm-Blooded Dinosaurs (1980), in the American Association for the Advancement of Science Selected Symposia Series, published by Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado, for the AAAS. Articles of particular use in the preparation of this chapter were:

R. T. Bakker, "Dinosaur Heresy—Dinosaur Renaissance: Why We Need Endother-mic Archosaurs for a Comprehensive Theory of Bioenergetic Evolution." Neil Greenberg, "Physiological and Behavioral Thermoregulation in Living Reptiles."

Nicholas Hotton III, "An Alternative to Dinosaur Endothermy: The Happy Wanderers."

J. H. Ostrom, "The Evidence for Endothermy in Dinosaurs."

P. J. Regal and C. Gans, "The Revolution in Thermal Physiology: Implications for Dinosaurs."

A. J. de Ricqles, "Tissue Structures of Dinosaur Bone: Functional Significance and Possible Relation to Dinosaur Physiology."

4. D. H. Enlow and S. 0. Brown, "A Comparative Histological Study of Fossil and Recent Bone Tissues. Part II," Texas Journal ofScience 9 (1957):186-214.

Acid preparations, 150-51 Albertosaurus, 73, 160 Alligators, 114 Allosaurus, 68 American Museum of Natural History, 22, 26, 28, 48, 80, 86, 163 Amphibians, 66-68,179 Anastomosing streams, 109

Ankylosaurs, 68, 72, 136 Anticlines, 91-94, 92; see also Willow Creek anticline

Apatosaurus, 68, 71, 84 Archaeopteryx, 172

Baby dinosaurs, 14, 18-19, 23, 29, 34-35, 51-55, 53, 63, 94, 98, 102, 105, 106, 108, 191, 192,193-94; death of, 55; determining genus and species of, 59-63; femurs of adults vs., 56; fossilization of, 55-56; growth patterns in, 56-57, 173; in nests after hatching, 112-14, 115; parental care of, 58-59, 62, 63, 114, 115,132,160, 165, 188, 189; predators and, 113-14; scarcity of fossils of, 25-27; size of, 112-13; skulls of, 83; teeth of, 57-58, 57, 112 Baird, Don, 22, 23, 51,

63, 75, 76, 119 Bakker, Robert T., 71, 87, 171-72, 173, 181

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